Home Sea Level Rise
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Sea Level Rise

Sea level is projected to rise at least 16 inches along the California coast by 2050, with a 55-inch rise predicted by 2100. The primary impacts from sea level rise are increases in flooding and erosion. Sea level rise will expand the area vulnerable to flooding during major storms, as well as in the rare but catastrophic event of a major tsunami. 

The term 100-year flood is used as a standard for planning, insurance, and environmental analysis.  People, infrastructure, and property are already located in areas vulnerable to flooding from a 100-year event. Sea level rise will cause more frequent—and more damaging—floods to those already at risk and will increase the size of the coastal floodplain, placing new areas at risk to flooding.



2013-14 Humboldt Bay King Tides Photo album

We've launched our 2013-14 Humboldt Bay King Tides Photo album featuring nearly 100 photos taken by volunteer and staff photographers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can browse the photos or you can view them by area using Flickr's handy mapping feature.

Maps of vulnerable shorelines are posted at the Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation, and Conservation District’s Humboldt Bay Sea Level Rise Adaptation Planning Project.

To view King Tide photos from other parts of the state, visit the California King Tide Photo Initiative.

Above: Eureka Slough and Jacobs Avenue businesses, Eureka. Photo by J. Kalt.

Have photos? Submit them to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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New Year’s Day King Tide On Liscom Slough
Written by Mad River Union   

1/2/13


JACKSON RANCH ROAD – Skunky LaRue was nowhere to be found during today’s King Tide along Liscom Slough, but Ted Halstead and Third District Supervisor Mark Lovelace went kayaking there anyway.

 

Photos by Ted, Mark and Kevin L. Hoover.

 

Click HERE to see the photo gallery.

 
Be a King Tides Groupie
Written by Heidi Walters, North Coast Journal   

12/27/13

King tides are exciting: The ocean creeps up and up into our faces, higher than usual, until we can’t help but stop in the middle of the Eureka Slough Bridge to gaze and wonder, “Where’d that skinny island go?” And then, driving around Humboldt Bay, we marvel at the overtopped dikes and waterlogged bay islands and other high-nibble shores.


Real exciting — and unnerving to imagine in conjunction with sea-level rise.


Well, here’s your task, you morbid water watchers: Some mighty king tides are coming in a few days, and Humboldt Baykeeper wants you to volunteer to go out there and document what happens at “vulnerable areas of the bay’s shoreline,” as it notes in a news release.


“King tides are extreme high tide events that occur when the sun and moon's gravitational forces magnify one another,” says the release. “King tides tend to be more dramatic in the winter when storms cause increased wind and waves along the coast.”


The next king tides begin Dec. 31 with a high tide expected to be a foot higher than the average high tide, says the release — and the highest high tide in 2013 (at the North Spit tide gage, for instance, the tide is expected to rise to 8.56 at 10 a.m). They’ll spill over (ha ha) into the new year on Jan. 1 (with an 8.65 tide at 10:52 a.m. at the north Spit gage) and Jan. 2. Your “images will help document flooding, erosion and levee breaches that we are likely to face with increasing frequency as sea level continues to rise,” says the release.


All you need is a camera or smartphone. To adopt a site to document, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Your pics will go up online (check out 2012’s King Tide Photo Initiative entries).


Baykeeper’s Jennifer Kalt’s recommended king tide observation spots don’t include Eureka Slough Bridge — gotta admit it’s a scary, traffic-zipping spot, but the king tide there Monday will be 9 feet, and on Tuesday, Christmas Eve, 9.24 feet! They do include Halvorsen Park and the F Street boardwalk in Eureka, Woodley Island, the Mad River Slough Bridge on Highway 255 in Manila, Liscom Slough on Jackson Ranch Road in Arcata, Fields Landing and King Salmon. And of course you should check out NOAA’s tide predictions.


As ever, use your noggin on this adventure and be careful.


For more info on high tides, sea level rise and Humboldt Bay in particular, check out Humboldt Baykeeper’s sea level rise site; the Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District’s Humboldt Bay Sea Level Rise Adaptation Planning Project and our profile of the man who walked around the bay and meticulously documented its shoreline and its vulnerabilities, Aldaron’s Walkabout.


Read Original Article

 
King tides to hit coast 


Written by Will Houston, Times-Standard   

No major flooding expected due to good weather



12/29/13



The highest and lowest tides of the year — commonly known as king tides — will hit North Coast beaches this week, but won’t cause as much of a splash as in previous years, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Alex Dodd.


“We’re not expecting any major coastal flooding like what happened in 2005 and 2006,”Dodd said. “But on places like the jetty and steeper beaches, the water level will be substantially higher.”




Dodd said king tides arise from the gravitational forces resulting from when the “Earth is closest to the sun and the moon is closest to the Earth.”




This year’s king tides are predicted to range from 8.29 feet to 8.65 feet above the Mean Lower Low Water mark — lower than the average of 8.79 feet — and will mostly remain at those heights due to good weather, Dodd said.




“We have a great big ridge of high pressure that has kept any storms well to our north,” Dodd said. “Fortunately or unfortunately, depending on your perspective, we won’t have any rain or southerly winds during that time, so the tide levels will be close to what’s being predicted.”




For Humboldt Baykeeper policy director Jennifer Kalt, king tides provide a visualization of the impacts of rising sea levels on habitats and infrastructure near Humboldt Bay.




“The Humboldt Bay area has a lot of really low-lying areas and double the sea rise effect due to its seismic activity,” Kalt said. “It’s a problem happening right now. It’s not going to happen slowly over time.”




As a way to display these impacts, Humboldt Baykeeper started their King Tide Photo Initiative in 2012 to create a visual database illustrating how the temporary rise in sea level caused by king tides can effect areas near the bay. The photos are mainly submitted by volunteers who photograph structures being hit by the abnormally high tides.




For this year’s initiative, Kalt plans to expand the number of areas photographed as well as revisit some of the areas photographed last year.




Kalt said that the issue of sea level rise will go beyond infrastructure.


“We’ve already lost about 90 percent of our coastal wetlands,” she said. “All the salt marshes in Humboldt Bay have levees that won’t be able to sustain the amount of water. As the sea level rises, the wildlife living in the wetlands and eelgrass beds will have to move inland.”




Aldaron Laird, an environmental consultant for the Humboldt Bay Sea Level Rise Adaptation Planning Project, said that it is important for people to see king tides for themselves.




“I encourage people to go out to Humboldt Bay to see how full the bay is with just 1 foot of sea level rise,” Laird said. “Humboldt Bay is pretty much filled to capacity — it won’t have the ability to contain 2 or 3 more feet.”




In January, Laird completed a study funded by the California Coastal Conservancy on the effects of sea level rise on Humboldt Bay. The study referenced a 2012 study from the University of California Santa Cruz, which found that Humboldt Bay had the highest rate of sea level rise in California at 18.6 inches per century — more than twice the state average, according to Laird.




Laird’s study also showed that since 1977, 12 king tide events have exceeded the average of 8.79 feet for Humboldt Bay, with seven of those occurring since 2000.




Dodd said he has not seen any abnormal changes in king tides over the years, but said sea level rise will have an impact on them.




“The common sense answer is if the sea level rises, then that is going to result in a higher water level and tides on top of that,” he said.




For the North Spit of Humboldt Bay, high tides are expected to reach 8.29 feet at 9:09 a.m. on Monday, 8.56 feet at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 8.65 feet at 10:52 a.m. on Wednesday and 8.54 feet at 11:42 a.m. on Thursday, according to tide predictions from the NOAA Tides and Currents website.




Those interested in participating in the Humboldt Baykeeper King Tide Photo Initiaive are asked to contact the organization online at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 707-268-8897.

 

Read Original Article

 
Forecast: Rising Tides on Humboldt Bay: Tues. Nov. 12

The Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation, and Conservation District and Humboldt County Public Works Department invite the public to an informational meeting on planning for the potential effects of sea level rise around Humboldt Bay. The meeting will be held on Tuesday, November 12, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, room 203, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka.

 

This meeting provides an opportunity for the public to learn about the sea level rise project and ask questions of the sea level rise adaptation planning team.

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