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Sea Level Rise

Sea level is projected to rise at least 16 inches along the California coast by 2050, with a 55-inch rise predicted by 2100. The primary impacts from sea level rise are increases in flooding and erosion. Sea level rise will expand the area vulnerable to flooding during major storms, as well as in the rare but catastrophic event of a major tsunami. 

The term 100-year flood is used as a standard for planning, insurance, and environmental analysis.  People, infrastructure, and property are already located in areas vulnerable to flooding from a 100-year event. Sea level rise will cause more frequent—and more damaging—floods to those already at risk and will increase the size of the coastal floodplain, placing new areas at risk to flooding.



Humboldt Bay King Tides Photo Initiative 2014-15

The highest tides this winter - known as King Tides - will occur on Dec. 5, Dec. 22, Jan. 20, and Feb. 18. Humboldt Baykeeper volunteers will photo-document the King Tides around Humboldt Bay.


All you need is a camera or a smartphone. To help document this year’s King Tide, email us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ." data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ."> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . We will assign sites that you can photograph during one or more high tide events as well as low tide shots for comparison. Photo: Chevron fuel tanks on the Eureka waterfront, 12-31-13.

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How will we plan for Sea Level Rise? Mon. Nov. 17, 6-8 pm

Why is sea level rising twice as fast here as it is along the rest of the Pacific coast? Which areas around Humboldt Bay are most likely to be under water in the future? How will sea level rise affect the agricultural lands on former bay tidelands? How will Caltrans keep Highway 101 above water? What will happen in low-lying areas of Arcata and Eureka?

 

The Humboldt Bay Sea Level Rise Adaptation Planning Project will provide an update for the public at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka.

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2013-14 Humboldt Bay King Tides Photo album

We've launched our 2013-14 Humboldt Bay King Tides Photo album featuring nearly 100 photos taken by volunteer and staff photographers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: Eureka Slough and Jacobs Avenue businesses, Eureka. Photo by J. Kalt.

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New Year’s Day King Tide On Liscom Slough
Written by Mad River Union   

1/2/13


JACKSON RANCH ROAD – Skunky LaRue was nowhere to be found during today’s King Tide along Liscom Slough, but Ted Halstead and Third District Supervisor Mark Lovelace went kayaking there anyway.

 

Photos by Ted, Mark and Kevin L. Hoover.

 

Click HERE to see the photo gallery.

 
Be a King Tides Groupie
Written by Heidi Walters, North Coast Journal   

12/27/13

King tides are exciting: The ocean creeps up and up into our faces, higher than usual, until we can’t help but stop in the middle of the Eureka Slough Bridge to gaze and wonder, “Where’d that skinny island go?” And then, driving around Humboldt Bay, we marvel at the overtopped dikes and waterlogged bay islands and other high-nibble shores.


Real exciting — and unnerving to imagine in conjunction with sea-level rise.


Well, here’s your task, you morbid water watchers: Some mighty king tides are coming in a few days, and Humboldt Baykeeper wants you to volunteer to go out there and document what happens at “vulnerable areas of the bay’s shoreline,” as it notes in a news release.

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