Home Sea Level Rise
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Sea Level Rise

Sea level is projected to rise at least 16 inches along the California coast by 2050, with a 55-inch rise predicted by 2100. The primary impacts from sea level rise are increases in flooding and erosion. Sea level rise will expand the area vulnerable to flooding during major storms, as well as in the rare but catastrophic event of a major tsunami. 

The term 100-year flood is used as a standard for planning, insurance, and environmental analysis.  People, infrastructure, and property are already located in areas vulnerable to flooding from a 100-year event. Sea level rise will cause more frequent—and more damaging—floods to those already at risk and will increase the size of the coastal floodplain, placing new areas at risk to flooding.



King Tides Tour, Wednesday, December 14 in Arcata


At 11:30 am on Wed. Dec. 14, Humboldt Baykeeper and Sea Level Rise Planner Aldaron Laird will host a tour during the highest tide of 2016-17. The tide is predicted to reach 8.6' at noon, although it could be up to a foot higher in stormy conditions.

 

We'll meet at the Arcata Wastewater Treatment Facility on South G Street. From there, we'll walk to the King Tides Observation Bench, which was donated to the City by Aldaron & Christy Laird in January.

 

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Arcata City Council Study Session on Sea Level Rise Planning, Wed. Dec. 14 @ 6 pm
 
The City of Arcata is one of several local jurisdictions to receive state grant funding to develop sea level rise policies for its upcoming Local Coastal Program (LCP) Update, which governs coastal development within certain areas of the city.

This study session is an opportunity to get up to speed on which areas of the city are most at risk  and will feature a discussion of various approaches for adapting to future changes to our shoreline as the sea rises. 
 
Topics to be discussed will include:
 

     ~ Background on Tides and Sea Level Rise

     ~ Sea Level Rise Projections and Policy Implications

     ~ Current Conditions and Adaptation Strategies

     ~ Pathways for Public Engagement

  1. A public comment period will follow the discussion.

Location: Arcata City Council Chambers, 736 F Street in Arcata

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Eureka Planning Commission Hearing on Sea Level Rise Planning Mon. Dec. 12 @ 5:30pm



The City of Eureka is one of several local jurisdictions to receive state grant funding to develop sea level rise policies for its upcoming Local Coastal Program (LCP) Update, which governs coastal development within certain areas of the city.
 
The Eureka Planning Commission will discuss draft sea level rise policies, which could result in coastly damage in areas vulnerable to flooding by planning for only 6 inches of sea level rise by 2050, rather than 2 feet as recommended by the Coastal Commission's Policy Guidance. The City's staff report includes several policies that do not compy with the Coastal Act, including shoreline armoring for new development, and also calls for lobbying the Legislature to change the Coastal Act rather than planning for the future. This approach is at odds with common-sense strategies to plan for the future and could undermine the credibility of state-funded work underway to assess local sea level rise impacts.
 
Location: Eureka City Council Chambers, 531 K Street in Eureka
 
 
 
 
 
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Humboldt Bay King Tide Photo Initiative 2016-17

The highest tides this winter - known as King Tides - will occur on Oct. 17, Nov. 17, Dec. 13-14, Jan. 11-12. 

To help document this year’s King Tide, All you need is a camera or a smartphone. Submit photos to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Be very cautious of rising water, eroding shoreline, flooded roadways, and high winds during any extreme high tide events. 

Photo by Saroj Gilbert, South I Street in Arcata, 10-28-15.

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Obama Moves To Protect Against Flooding From Rising Sea Levels
Written by Kate Sheppard, Huffington Post   

1/30/15

President Barack Obama issued an executive order on Friday directing federal, state and local agencies to incorporate projections for sea level rise in planning and construction along the coasts.

 

The new Federal Flood Risk Management Standard requires that all federally funded projects located in floodplains, including buildings and roads, be built to withstand flooding. The requirement, the White House said in a release Friday, would “reduce the risk and cost of future flood disasters” and “help ensure federal projects last as long as intended.”

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