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Welcome to Humboldt Baykeeper
Citizen Scientists Look for Sources of Bacteria Pollution
Written by Jennifer Kalt for EcoNews   

 

Since 2005, our Citizen Water Monitoring Program has sampled streams from Little River to Elk River. In 2015, the U.S. EPA designated six creeks as “impaired” by bacteria based on our data. Since then, we have been working with the Regional Water Board and Humboldt County Public Health Lab to identify source animals (humans, cattle, dogs, birds, and other wildlife). After four sampling events in 2016, we are waiting for the results of the genetic analysis, which Humboldt County Public Health Lab is perfecting.

 

What is E. coli?


E. coli is a type of bacteria that lives in the guts of warm-blooded animals. It is an indicator of fecal bacteria and viruses that can cause illness when ingested in food or water. People can be exposed to it by drinking contaminated water or through contact with polluted water when swimming, surfing, etc. You can prevent exposure by avoiding contact with streams, bay, and ocean for 72 hours after storms.

 

Click the thumbnail to enlarge.

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EPA Says Eureka, Harbor District Should Have Known Dredging Disposal on the Beach Wouldn’t be Allowed
Written by Ryan Burns, Lost Coast Outpost   

5/5/17

 

Until late last week, the City of Eureka and the Humboldt County Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District, the two agencies responsible for performing maintenance dredging, planned to dump the dredge spoils on a beach along the Samoa Peninsula, as they have for years.

 

EPA public affairs officer Bill Keener said beach dumping is not allowed because the sediment from the bay is primarily composed of fine-grain silts and mud, making it inappropriate for the surf zone on sandy beaches. “However, the 1998 permit for the Harbor’s dredging was inappropriately issued by the [U.S. Army] Corps of Engineers allowing continued surf-zone disposal,” Keener explained. “[The] EPA, the Corps, and the Coastal Commission all agreed to allow that permit to stay in force, in order to give the Harbor time to plan (and budget) for a different dredging operation after the permit expired in 2008.”

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New Headquarters at 415 I Street in Arcata!

On December 1, the Northcoast Environmental Center, Humboldt Baykeeper and Californians for Alternatives to Toxics (CATs) will have new headquarters in the Cooper Building at 415 I Street in Arcata. This new location will be more accessible and visible for volunteers, interns, and interested community members. 

 

"We are excited to launch this new chapter in a better position to engage the community in what will certainly be challenging times for environmental advocacy," said Jennifer Kalt, Director of Humboldt Baykeeper. 

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Report A Spill Here!

For spills in Humboldt Bay:

  • Cailfornia Office of Emergency Services (800) 852-7550

For spills in or near storm drains (which drain to creeks and Humboldt Bay)

  • Eureka Public Works Dept. (707) 441-4192
  • Arcata Environmental Services Dept. (707) 822-8184
  • Humboldt County Public Works Dept. (707) 445-7491

Storm drains are separate from sewer systems, so stormwater flows into our coastal waterways UNTREATED. Humboldt Baykeeper is working hard to protect our environment but we can't do it alone. We need your help!

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Explore the Bay - Explora la Bahía 2017

Humboldt Baykeeper’s Bay Explorations program offers free, docent-led walking tours of the Hikshari’ Trail on the Eureka waterfront, as well as tours of the bay by motor boat, kayak, or canoe.  

La programa de Humboldt Baykeeper’s Exploraciones de la Bahía ofrece gratis, visita de guiada a pie del Hikshari’ Trail en la zona costera de Eureka, así como tours de la bahía por barco de motor, kayac, o conoa. 

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Keeper of the Bay: “An Individual can make a difference”
Written by Will Houston, Times-Standard   

Humboldt Baykeeper’s Jen Kalt is one of nine women featured in the Times-Standard's Monday Magazine, a new publication celebrating local women in business. 

 

Kalt says that the lack of enforcement of many environmental laws in Humboldt County is “severe” and criticized decision makers who she said have “enabled” businesses to operate outside of those laws.

 

“I think that’s an injustice to the people who believe in running their business in ways that follow the laws and protect the environment and community,” she said.

 

“Industries come and go, but the bay and rivers, if we destroy them, they’re gone forever.”

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New Dioxin Data: Good News, Bad News

Since Baykeeper’s 2006 success in getting Humboldt Bay designated as impaired by dioxin, sampling for this long-lasting contaminant has become common for dredging, restoration, and development projects. One recent study has revealed a major dioxin hotspot in Humboldt Bay near the Arcata Marsh. The good news is that ongoing monitoring at a former lumber mill in Eureka has shown that the cleanup brought by Baykeeper’s legal action has been effective.

 

Click HERE to download the article.

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